Ambiguity relief process

Ambiguity relief process

Day 3 – DC Psychology Trainer Certification Bali, December 2019

Take a breath and imagine the following scenario:

You wake up, and you’re not excited to go to work. You feel like the people that you work with just don’t get you. Everyone is always blaming somebody else, and no one is ever taking responsibility for their own actions.

Begrudgingly, you go into the office, yet, on the way into the office you listen to your favorite music which puts you into a good mood. You bring your positivity into the office, and greet your coworkers with a smile.

“Maybe today will be different,” you think to yourself. “I’m going to share my good mood with the entire office and everything is going to go smoothly.”

You get called into the office by your boss. He yells at you for missing a deadline. You cringe, knowing that you missed the deadline, but it was only because the financial department hadn’t gotten you the numbers that you needed to do your job.

“I couldn’t do it because finance never got me those numbers!” You exclaim.

You see the disappointment on his face. And you promised to have the project in by tomorrow morning. you call the finance department where the secretary informs you that they didn’t know that you needed the numbers last week.

As you hang up the phone with Finance, you look over and see your coworker to the right surfing on Facebook. You turn to your left and another coworker sending personal photos on their email.

“Why am I getting picked on if no one is engaged and everyone else is giving off? I was at least trying to do my job, but couldn’t do it because other people weren’t doing their‘s.” You think to yourself.

In the afternoon, you go to a meeting. It’s exit 2 hours of your time that you could’ve been working on your report. Nothing gets done. People argue and blame each other. Other people appear to be daydreaming. You present workable solutions to the problems, yet no one seems to hear your ideas. It’s as if you were speaking to the wall.
In the afternoon, you go to a meeting. It’s exit 2 hours of your time that you could’ve been working on your report. Nothing gets done. People argue and blame each other. Other people appear to be daydreaming. You present workable solutions to the problems, yet no one seems to hear your ideas. It’s as if you were speaking to the wall.

He finally must admit to yourself that even though you came into the office with a positive attitude, this day was no different than any other day.

“Why am I even working here if no one cares?” You wonder.

You have dinner that evening with a friend you have not seen in several months. You unload on to your friend about how disastrous your workday was and how no one seems to trust you to get your job done.

“Have you heard about how the ambiguity relief process impacts trust in your organization?“ Your friend asks.

“ No? “You respond.

“One of the root causes of trust breakdown is due to the brain’s ambiguity relief process. The ambiguity relief process is genetically how your brain achieves clarity. When we don’t understand how each other‘s brains genetically receive clarity, we miscommunicate. This miscommunication results in fear which results in a lack of trust. And people do not feel trust in an organization they are not innovative, proactive, or highly engaged. This makes them underachievers.

“Not only do underachievers bring down the work environment so that going to work is no fun for everyone, they also waste company time by not being productive. If an underachiever is only productive 70% of the time, 30% of the time that their boss is paying them is for not utilized time.” Your friend tells you.

“So, our miscommunications are genetic? It’s not just the people that I work with are lazy or stupid?“ You ask.

“ That’s right! We all have different genetic make up‘s in our brain the impact how we gain clarity, which impacts how we think and how we behave. And if we expect people whose brains are genetically different than ours to think how we do, this leads to miscommunication. However, when we understand these genetic differences, it builds more trust in our organizations which allows us to bring out the best part of ourselves, have more sharing of ideas, and to be less judge mental. That only does this make the business culture more fun, but it also drastically improves business profitability.” Your friend responds.

Intrigued, you ask, “How do I learn more about this?”

“By taking the CBCI test! By understanding how your brain genetically works and how the brains of your coworkers genetically work, you can build stronger teams and become a more effective leader as well as helping your company increase its profitability.” Your friend replies.

You leave dinner with your friend grateful that you have learned about this new tool that can teach you more about yourself and help change your corporate culture, which will not only make your job less stressful, more fun, and give you space for greater creativity, but it will also help your employer make more money.

On the ride home, you are excited about all of the possibilities that come from learning about the ambiguity relief process and how you can share this newfound information with your company tomorrow.

 

Author:
Mariah Rossel
DC Psychology Trainer Certification Participant

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